What Does Ramadan's Wait Feel Like?

Ramadan waits for his heart surgery. His face is expressionless.

Ramadan is a 14 year-old surrounded by 14 month-olds.

Three days of sitting in a hospital, waiting and afraid. As if being surrounded by crying babies isn’t enough to put anyone on edge, Ramadan is old enough to know what’s coming. 

Ramadan's cousin accompanies him when he is admitted to hospital in Libya for heart surgery.

He hears people whisper “very risky case” and “I’m afraid for him.”

Unlike the other children, Ramadan will remember all of this. And even if he forgets a few details, he’ll never lose the feeling of it all—how that knot in his stomach felt as it crept up into his throat. 

Ramadan has blood an IV line now, to make receiving medications easier during his heart surgery.

Before surgery, a lot of the team were worried about him. The nurses broke their rule about not getting too fond of a child before surgery, but it was too late—we fell for Ramadan and long to see him healed! Hopefully, all will be well.

Come back tomorrow to hear how the operation went. 

Ramadan is dressed in a sterile gown, sitting on his bed waiting for his heart surgery. His mom smooths his hair behind his ear with the back of her fingers.

About Matthew Willingham

Matt Willingham is Preemptive Love's Senior Field Editor and writes primarily on politics, history, general updates and visual peacemaking through photography and film.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
What Does Ramadan's Wait Feel Like?
What Does Ramadan's Wait Feel Like?
Choose hope, bravery, and peace with me by supporting @preemptivelove